DIY Hypertufa Hand Planters

As I mentioned in my previous post (here), DIY hypertufa hand tutorials are not very easy to come by online.

I’ve just found one more such article, from Jenise, over at DIYFunIdeas.com. If you’ve been following my blog or reading some of my posts, you probably know already that I periodically post links to good tutorials for making various hypertufa garden art objects here. As I type this, I’ve posted well over a dozen (close to two dozens) of such links thus far.

If you are in to DIY hypertufa to any extent, you probably know already that hands are one of the most difficult hypertufa garden art objects to make but Jenise makes it as easy as it could possibly be done. In fact, something I can confidently tell you now is that in my opinion, Jenise’s how-to tutorial is The Best out of all that I have posted so far. (I would not be really surprised if she would make a great teacher. :-))

While this tutorial is written with flowing text (and not in a numbered or bulleted, step-by-step manner), it provides all the necessary DIY and how-to information including the recipe etc. in an easy to follow style, with plenty of (beautiful) pictures all along the way.

To sum up, if you’re interested in making great looking hands and/or hand-shaped planters with hypertufa, I (strongly) suggest you check out the article – DIY Concrete Hand Planters and Bowls – at the link below. The least I can assure you is that you’ll not be disappointed:

diy-hypertufa-hand-planters

 

http://diyfunideas.com/diy-concrete-hand-planters-bowls/

DIY Hypertufa PDF eBook

Claudia Brownlie – a fellow garden art enthusiast who is way too deep in to DIY hypertufa publishes a PDF eBook that she calls ‘Hypertufa How-To Manual’.

With over 100 pages of step-by-step DIY information accompanied by scores of pictures, this eBook can show you how to make a variety of garden art objects using hypertufa, whether you are a beginner to the art of hypertufa or one with some experience.

Starting from basics like hypertufa recipe and safety information, this eBook goes to show you how to make a number of different garden art objects using hypertufa, such as pots, planters, troughs, balls, stones, leaves, sculptures etc. and promises to make you a ‘creative mud-pie maker extraordinaire’ by the time you get done with it. ­čÖé

While this eBook is not free to download (~$25), if you are in to DIY garden art and/or hypertufa, you certainly want to give it a try. (Claudia does offer a full refund if you don’t like her eBook for any reason or find it useful).

hypertufa-how-to-manual-pdf

http://www.hypertufabooks.com/

About my DIY Hypertufa blog

If you do not know what is hypertufa (an amazing art of creating beautiful garden objects and ornaments like pots, planters, rocks, spheres etc. using portland cement, peat moss, perlite or vermiculite and some other materials), I’m afraid my blog is not for you. (You can google ‘what is hypertufa’ to quickly and easily find this out.)

The main reason I’ve created this DIY hypetufa blog is to share useful links where hypertufa enthusiasts (like me) can find (mostly) free information on how to make various hypertufa objects on their own – the DIY way.

Obviously, one can google ‘diy hypertufa’ to find many such resources directly as well. As a diy gardening and ‘tufa enthusiast, I’ve been doing this myself, for quite some time now (and like I said, so can you). The reason why I thought of creating this blog is two-fold:

1. Many of the results shown by google (and other search engines like yahoo, bing etc.) do not provide diy hypertufa information that is actually useful for practical purposes and (almost conversely)

2. Many websites/pages providing useful and practical information are not shown in the search results (not in the top 2 or 3 pages at least).

Over a period of time, I’ve dug out, vetted and collected a number of such useful and practical (but not easy to find) how-to and DIY hypertufa links which I intend to share via this blog. Most of the links I share will have either textual/pictorial or video information using which you can actually make some hypertufa object or the other.

I hope what I share here will be of use to other budding (as well as seasoned) hypertufa and garden art enthusiasts.